RIT/NTID student Abraham Glasser, a computer science major, presented his research at the Mathematical Association of America's Seaway Section meeting at SUNY Brockport. The title of his presentation, "Failed Power Domination: Computational Results, Extreme Values, and Complexity," was co-authored by RIT/NTID student Emily Lederman. Graph theory work done by Abraham and Emily, along with RIT/NTID Professor Bonnie Jacob, was supported by an NTID Scholarship Portfolio Development Initiative (SPDI) grant.

Headshot of a smiling Asian girl with long black hair and black top.

When Ping Liu first arrived at RIT, she couldn’t speak English and didn’t know American Sign Language. Today, she is one of the most successful students in her major and is being recognized with the RIT Outstanding Service Award for International Students.

Liu, 24, is from a small village in northern China where her parents are farmers. Her dream school has been RIT since she was in middle school. An applied computer technology major, Liu hopes to earn her master’s degree in human-centered computing and eventually teach in China and one day work at the United Nations to help deaf people all over the world.

Like many international students, Liu arrived in the United States unaware of the hurdles she would have to overcome and adjustments she would have to make to be successful in the American educational system.

“I had a hard time communicating,” she said. “On the first day of class, I did not think I could stay in the United States for one more day. I felt so lonely and nervous.”

She soon joined RIT/NTID’s Asian Deaf Club as the cultural director and the Deaf International Student Association as the program director, and became an integral part of the college community.

But where Liu really shines is her passionate, enthusiastic promotion of RIT. She created a website to promote RIT among deaf Chinese students. She teaches ASL on the website, fields questions about RIT and applying to RIT, gives advice on taking the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), including feedback on student writing for the test. 

She also wants to establish a scholarship for Chinese students who are deaf. She is at RIT/NTID on scholarship and wants to give back.

“I want to do something good while I am here,” she said. “RIT has changed my life, and I want to do the same for others.”

male actor dressed in costume stands between two female actors in costume.

Kendall Charles is a fourth-year computing and information technologies major from Opelousas, Louisiana, who is adopting the role of Beast in NTID's Performing Arts production of "The Story of Beauty and the Beast." Charles has enjoyed acting and theater since elementary school, and has been featured in three theatrical productions at RIT. Learn more about this talented student.

Woman sits in front of a grey background wearing a navy blue, long sleeve shirt.

RIT/NTID has a strong history of successful employment outcomes for our graduates, including Mary Rose Weber from Apple Valley, Minn. Weber, who received an associate degree in applied computer technology and a bachelor's degree in information technology, will start work at Target's headquarters in Minneapolis, Minn. See Mary's video.

Faculty member Brian Trager wearing blue shirt instructing class.

When faculty members at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf were creating a new degree program in mobile application development, they looked to cross-platform developer Xamarin Inc. for guidance and expertise. The result of this collaboration is the fall launch of a new academic program, which recently received approval by the New York State Education Department and earned a grant from the National Science Foundation of more than $820,000.

Funding from the three-year NSF grant, “RoadMaPPs to Careers: A New Approach to Mobile Apps Education featuring a Mapp for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students,” will train and equip students in RIT/NTID’s Information and Computing Studies Department where the new program will be housed, and is based on the Xamarin cross-platform approach to mobile application development.

Headquartered in San Francisco, Xamarin assisted in the development of the new associate degree program, and company representatives serve on the advisory board for curriculum review. The company recently was acquired by Microsoft.

“Xamarin has given us access to their ‘Xamarin University’ curriculum materials, provided data we needed for our program and grant proposals, came to campus to carefully review our plans and gave us invaluable guidance,” said Elissa Olsen, chairperson of RIT/NTID’s Information and Computing Studies Department. “We are so pleased that they have agreed to serve on our program advisory board and continue to guide the program in the future based on industry trends.”

The company also will support student-learning activities such as career awareness events and will hire students for co-op and full-time employment.

“We are proud that Xamarin will play a major role in the overall success of the mobile app development program, not only because the curriculum uses the Xamarin platform, but also because our experts will advise and assist the team on all aspects of the program,” said Bryan Costanich, vice president of education services at Xamarin Inc. “This is a unique opportunity to work with the deaf community to provide training and employment in one of the fastest growing industry segments.”