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Meet Sara Kimbley, an RIT/NTID student from Lakeland, Florida. She is a 2017 graduate from RIT's psychology program, and a Bridges scholar.

The Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate Program is the first of its kind that provides scientific mentoring for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals to become strong candidates for doctoral degree programs in biomedical or behavioral science disciplines. The program aims to train and prepare eligible students while they are in one of the approved master’s degree programs at RIT. More.

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The Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate Program is the first of its kind that provides scientific mentoring for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals to become strong candidates for doctoral degree programs in biomedical or behavioral science disciplines. The program aims to train and prepare eligible students while they are in one of the approved master’s degree programs at RIT.

Meet Tori Popov, a 2017 graduate from RIT's biomedical sciences program, and a Bridges scholar. More.

Female with long blond hair playing the viola.

RIT President Munson has a serious interest in elevating the role of performing arts for RIT students and the university community. According to Munson, the arts are a unique experiential learning component for students to develop critical thinking, hone their creative chops and learn to work collaboratively with others to create a finished work.

RIT/NTID student Israelle Johnson is a perfect example of how science and the arts intersect. Johnson is a laboratory science technology major from Baltimore, Ohio, and is a member of the RIT Orchestra and RIT Chamber Orchestra. Here is what Johnson has to say about her passion in music.

“I truly believe that people who are hard-of-hearing can play any music if they want to. I began playing the violin in fourth grade, but I realized that the higher pitches were harder for me to hear. After two years, I switched to the viola, which I’ve been playing ever since. When I came to RIT, being part of the RIT Orchestra gave me the chance to meet a lot of people outside of my degree program and home college. I rehearse with no interpreter because the conductor and I have learned how we can communicate best in that group setting. When the Orchestra or Chamber Orchestra perform, I’m just like any other student performer.

It takes a lot of teamwork for an orchestra to perform, and performing has helped me present myself more confidently in all activities. I know I will take those things with me in my career. I also know I want to continue playing after I graduate. I plan to work in a hospital lab for my career, but I had a chance to play with the New Albany (Ohio) Symphony Orchestra as a student musician, and I want to audition for them after I graduate.”

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Anna Krauss, a recent RIT/NTID graduate who majored in biotechnology and molecular bioscience, will continue her studies this summer in a post-baccalaureate program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and then start her Ph.D. in the fall in clinical translational sciences. Watch her video and learn more.

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Recent RIT/NTID graduate Aime Sankoh, who received an associate degree in laboratory science technology and a bachelor's degree in biotechnology, is heading to Tennessee to pursue a Ph.D. in biochemistry. Watch her video and learn more.