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Creating Concept Sentences

Each item below lists a phrase containing an -ed or -ing participle, followed by two possible related "concept sentences," A and B, and two possible related "alternate expressions," C and D. Click on A or B to indicate your choice for the correct related concept sentence, and click on C or D to indicate your choice for the correct related alternate expression. Remember, the -ed participle describes the EXPERIENCER, and the -ing participle describes the SOURCE.

1. An annoying child.

A. A child annoys someone.
B. Someone annoys a child.
C. A child feels annoyed by someone.
D. Someone feels annoyed by a child.
A: CORRECT concept sentence!
B: INCORRECT.
C: INCORRECT.
D: CORRECT alternate expression!

2. A frightened mouse.

A. A mouse frightens someone.
B. Something frightens a mouse.
C. Something is frightening to a mouse.
D. A mouse is frightening to someone.
A: INCORRECT.
B: CORRECT concept sentence!
C: CORRECT alternate expression!
D: INCORRECT.

3. A disappointed teacher.

A. The students disappoint a teacher.
B. A teacher disappoints the students.
C. The students are disappointing to the teacher.
D. A teacher is disappointing to the students.
A: CORRECT concept sentence!
B: INCORRECT.
C: CORRECT alternate expression!
D: INCORRECT.

4. An interesting candidate.

A. The job interests a candidate.
B. A candidate interests the search committee.
C. A candidate is interested in the job.
D. The search committee is interested in the candidate.
A: INCORRECT.
B: CORRECT concept sentence!
C: INCORRECT.
D: CORRECT alternate expression!