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Schedule & Session Information

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Unless otherwise noted: All Presentations and Panels are in the Panara Theatre, LBJ Bldg at RIT/NTID
Time Wed, 6 Nov 2019
5:30 – 7:30 pm Conference Kick-Off Reception & Registration Check-in - Dyer Arts Center
Time Thur, 7 Nov 2019 Fri, 8 Nov 2019 Sat, 9 Nov 2019
8:00 - 9:00 am Continental Breakfast Continental Breakfast Continental Breakfast
9:00 - 9:15 am Opening Remarks Opening Remarks Opening Remarks

9:15 – 10:30 am

Keynote Addresses

IVT: The Art of Emancipation Contribution to a History of Deaf Art: a selection of contemporary cases

Olivier Schetrit

“Do It For the Culture”: A Critical Look Into The Evolving BlackDeaf Expressions in Written English

Kristi Merriweather

Anthology of Poetics in Brazilian Sign Language

Fernanda de Araugo Machado
10:30 – 11:00 am Break Break Break

11:00 – 11:30 am

Presentations

De'VIA Manifesto

Paul Johnston and Amy Stevens

De'VIA: Understanding the Themes and Motifs

Nancy Rourke

Political Artivism through Deaf Lenses

Amy Cohen Efron

11:30 – 12:00 pm

Presentations

On Deaf (Creative) Writing: Past, Present, and Future

Kristen Harmon

Highlighting Intersectional Deafnicity: From Theory, to Experience, to Literature

Rachel Mazique

The Rise of Aesthetics and Intersectionality in Signed Language Performance Arts: Poetry and Music in Valli's "Dandelion"

Jody Cripps
12:00 – 12:15 pm Question and Answer Question and Answer Question and Answer
12:15 – 1:30 pm 12:15 - 12:45 Lunch provided

12:45 - 1:25 Nordic Deaf Theatre Co. Panel
Lunch on your own Lunch on your own

1:30 – 2:50 pm

Panels
Deaf History & Lives

 

Documenting Deaf NYC Stories

Brian H. Greenwald and Brianna DiGiovanni

 

Golden Years for Deaf Lesbians? An Exploration of Deaf Lesbian Options in Life’s Last Chapter

Bridget Klein

 

Yours Most Sincerely: A Study of the Friendship of a Nineteenth-Century Deaf-Mute Artist and Prominent Political Couple

Corinna Hill
Deaf-MadeTechnique

 

TDG LOL: Teaching Deaf Culture through Humor

Matt Daigle

 

Justin Perez’s Visual Vernacular

Justin Perez

 

From Deaf Eyes: Photography As A Visual Storyteller

Orkid Sassouni

 

Journey of ASL Literature and Deaf Art in Digital Media

Ruthie Jordan

Anderson Center for Interdisciplinary Studies—Deaf Artists Residency Program

 

Moderator: Cynthia Weitzel
Panelists: Rachel Mazique, Jennifer Nelson, Lilah Katcher, Katherine DeLorenzo

2:50 – 3:15 pm Question and Answer Question and Answer Question and Answer
3:15– 3:45 pm Break Break Break

3:45 – 4:15 pm

Presentations

Two Nations, Sign Languages and Sexes but One Shared Identity: Signed Poetry on Intersectionality of Deaf Queer African

Rezenet Moges Riedel

Making of an Epic in American Sign Language: Tapping into Martha's Vineyard to Shed New Light on Deaf Storytelling

Samuel J. Supalla and Andrew Byrne

Embodying Theory in the Classroom: Politics, Poetics and Pedagogy

Dirksen Bauman and Douglas Ridloff

4:15 – 4:45 pm

Presentations

Contribution of Black Deaf Performing Arts

Fred Beam

What are the ties between the film industry and us?

David de Keyzer

Screening of "Signing Black in America"

Joseph Hill
4:45 – 5:15 pm Question and Answer Question and Answer Question and Answer

6:00 – 7:30 pm

Special Events
Reception & Exhibit Memorial Art Gallery - (MAG) Dinner on your own NTID's DeafMute Banquet (separate ticket required) - RIT’s University Gallery

7:30 pm

Special Events
De'VIA: The Manifesto Comes of Age Exhibit Lockhart Gallery - (MAG) People of the 3rd Eye – NTID Production - Panara Theatre  

 

Unless otherwise noted: All Presentations and Panels are in the Panara Theatre, LBJ Bldg at RIT/NTID
Time Wed, 6 Nov 2019
5:30 – 7:30 pm Conference Kick-Off Reception & Registration Check-in - Dyer Arts Center
Time Thur, 7 Nov 2019
8:00 - 9:00 am Continental Breakfast
9:00 - 9:15 am Opening Remarks

9:15 – 10:30 am

Keynote Addresses

IVT: The Art of Emancipation Contribution to a History of Deaf Art: a selection of contemporary cases

Olivier Schetrit
10:30 – 11:00 am Break

11:00 – 11:30 am

Presentations

De'VIA Manifesto

Paul Johnston and Amy Stevens

11:30 – 12:00 pm

Presentations

On Deaf (Creative) Writing: Past, Present, and Future

Kristen Harmon
12:00 – 12:15 pm Question and Answer
12:15 – 12:45 pm Lunch provided
12:45 - 1:25 pm Nordic Deaf Theatre Co. Panel

1:30 – 2:50 pm

Panels
Deaf History & Lives

 

Documenting Deaf NYC Stories

Brian H. Greenwald and Brianna DiGiovanni

 

Golden Years for Deaf Lesbians? An Exploration of Deaf Lesbian Options in Life’s Last Chapter

Bridget Klein

 

Yours Most Sincerely: A Study of the Friendship of a Nineteenth-Century Deaf-Mute Artist and Prominent Political Couple

Corinna Hill
2:50 – 3:15 pm Question and Answer
3:15– 3:45 pm Break

3:45 – 4:15 pm

Presentations

Two Nations, Sign Languages and Sexes but One Shared Identity: Signed Poetry on Intersectionality of Deaf Queer African

Rezenet Moges Riedel

4:15 – 4:45 pm

Presentations

Contribution of Black Deaf Performing Arts

Fred Beam
4:45 – 5:15 pm Question and Answer

6:00 – 7:30 pm

Special Events
Reception & Exhibit Memorial Art Gallery - (MAG)

7:30 pm

Special Events
De'VIA: The Manifesto Comes of Age Exhibit Lockhart Gallery - (MAG)
Time Fri, 8 Nov 2019
8:00 - 9:00 am Continental Breakfast
9:00 - 9:15 am Opening Remarks

9:15 – 10:30 am

Keynote Addresses

“Do It For the Culture”: A Critical Look Into The Evolving BlackDeaf Expressions in Written English

Kristi Merriweather
10:30 – 11:00 am Break

11:00 – 11:30 am

Presentations

De'VIA in Understanding the Themes and Motifs

Nancy Rourke

11:30 – 12:00 pm

Presentations

Highlighting Intersectional Deafnicity: From Theory, to Experience, to Literature

Rachel Mazique
12:00 – 12:15 pm Question and Answer
12:15 – 1:30 pm Lunch on your own

1:30 – 2:50 pm

Panels
Deaf-MadeTechnique

 

TDG LOL: Teaching Deaf Culture through Humor

Matt Daigle

 

Justin Perez’ Visual Vernacular

Justin Perez

 

From Deaf Eyes: Photography As A Visual Storyteller

Orkid Sassouni

 

Journey of ASL Literature and Deaf Art in Digital Media

Ruthie Jordan
2:50 – 3:15 pm Question and Answer
3:15– 3:45 pm Break

3:45 – 4:15 pm

Presentations

Making of an Epic in American Sign Language: Tapping into Martha's Vineyard to Shed New Light on Deaf Storytelling

Samuel J. Supalla and Andrew Byrne

4:15 – 4:45 pm

Presentations

What are the ties between the film industry and us?

David de Keyzer
4:45 – 5:15 pm Question and Answer

6:00 – 7:30 pm

Special Events
Dinner on your own

7:30 pm

Special Events

People of the 3rd Eye – NTID Production - Panara Theatre

Time Sat, 9 Nov 2019
8:00 - 9:00 am Continental Breakfast
9:00 - 9:15 am Opening Remarks

9:15 – 10:30 am

Keynote Addresses

Anthology of Poetics in Brazilian Sign Language

Fernanda de Araugo Machado
10:30 – 11:00 am Break

11:00 – 11:30 am

Presentations

Political Artivism through Deaf Lenses

Amy Cohen Efron

11:30 – 12:00 pm

Presentations

The Rise of Aesthetics and Intersectionality in Signed Language Performance Arts: Poetry and Music in Valli's "Dandelion"

Jody Cripps
12:00 – 12:15 pm Question and Answer
12:15 – 1:30 pm Lunch on your own

1:30 – 2:50 pm

Panels

Anderson Center for Interdisciplinary Studies—Deaf Artists Residency Program

 

Moderator: Cynthia Weitzel
Panelists: Rachel Mazique, Jennifer Nelson, Lilah Katcher, Katherine DeLorenzo

2:50 – 3:15 pm Question and Answer
3:15– 3:45 pm Break

3:45 – 4:15 pm

Presentations

Embodying Theory in the Classroom: Poetics, Pedagogy and Politics

Dirksen Bauman and Douglas Ridloff

4:15 – 4:45 pm

Presentations

Screening of "Signing Black in America"

Joseph Hill
4:45 – 5:15 pm Question and Answer

6:00 – 7:30 pm

Special Events

NTID's DeafMute Banquet (separate ticket required) - RIT's University Gallery

Sessions

IVT: The Art of Emancipation Contribution to a History of Deaf Art: a selection of contemporary cases
Thur, 7 Nov 2019 (9:15 – 10:30 am)

Olivier Schetrit

In the past, Deaf Art has been little known and even ignored. Following the wave of student and social protest movements in 1968, it found new expression, recognition and freedom. The protest movements, which began in the United States, stimulated the founding of the International Visual Theatre (IVT) in Paris in 1976. IVT became a cultural hub for Deaf people where individuals came together through a shared passion for theatre and the Arts. It gave birth to a plethora of artistic projects incorporating sign language and visual culture practices. For a new generation of French Deaf artists, IVT was a starting point, which gradually freed them to create authentic expressions. Thanks to those creative visions, a vibrant contemporary Deaf Arts scene has emerged in France; however, this movement is still fragile and heavily dependent on the internet as there are few face-to-face forums for meetings, exchanges, and dissemination.

Presenter Bio:
Olivier Schetrit has a PhD in anthropology and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at CEMS-CNRS / EHESS in Paris.

Deaf from birth, he is a stylist and actor by training. He is part of the professional troupe, International Visual Theater (IVT), the only theater for the Deaf in Paris. He is also a pedagogue, director, and professional storyteller. After obtaining a professional license (Social Intervention, specialty teaching of sign language, Paris 8), he obtained a master's degree in social sciences. In 2016, he obtained his PhD in social anthropology and ethnology - EHESS-LAS-Collège of France-CNRS for his study, The Deaf culture filmic approach to artistic creation and identity issues of the Deaf in France and in transnational networks under the direction of Barbara Glowczewski. He has published about IVT, Deaf identity, aesthetics such as chansignes and choresignes.

De'VIA Manifesto
Thur, 7 Nov 2019 (11:00 – 11:30 am)

Paul Johnston and Amy Stevens

When the De’VIA Manifesto was written in 1989, a group of fine artists, led by painter Betty G. Miller, and sculptor Paul Johnston, gathered for a four-day workshop to focus on how to educate the community about Deaf art and artists. This happened within a short amount of time and without the benefit of Internet resources or a large cross-sampling of work. Consequently, common terminology such as Deaf experience, fine art, applied art, or design was not defined nor discussed.

This presentation will revisit the De’VIA Manifesto, 30 years later, to allow for a reinterpretation of its original mission and present an expansionist view to the artistic, Deaf communities. For an expansive vision to thrive, we will propose that the Deaf community must take up this challenge: to engage in more scholarly research, to develop theory, design curriculum, and publish criticism to push forward an all-encompassing vision of De’VIA.

Presenter Bio:
Paul Johnston was a founding member of De’VIA (an acronym for Deaf View Image Art). For 32 years Dr. Johnston taught at Gallaudet University. In 2011, he was artist in residence at Siena Art Institute in Siena, Italy. Expressive in many mediums, he was the first person to receive a Bachelor of Fine Arts in furniture design and woodworking from the School for American Craftsman at Rochester Institute of Technology. He holds a Master’s and Doctoral degree in Art Education with Phi Delta Kappa honors from Penn State University. He was a company member of the National Theatre of the Deaf, and an original designer of Signing Mime—a performing company—where he wrote and directed plays. He has taught and led workshops and lectures on ASL poetry, creative signing and visual gestural communication. He has been a frequent lecturer, exhibition juror, moderator and guest artist in the U.S. and Europe.

Amy Stevens is a tenured professor of communication studies at Gallaudet University. Through her academic career, Professor Stevens has incorporated experiential learning in a broad range of courses including Women’s Body Image in Advertising, Civil Rights Struggles through Images and Text, and Introduction to Mass Communication. Drawing upon her degrees in journalism, communication and art, Professor Stevens taught students how to write and design 24-page booklets, multi-page websites, infographics, posters and large banners. Students also embraced two-dimensional designs in several exhibits, titled “Social Justice Sneakers: Walk in Someone Else’s Shoes,” “Tears, Trials and Triumph: The African American Story,” and “Iconic Images: One Button at a Time.” Professor Stevens’ MFA is in graphic design from Howard University. She serves as the media liaison and internship coordinator for the Communication Studies program.

On Deaf (Creative) Writing: Past, Present, and Future
Thur, 7 Nov 2019 (11:30 – 12:00 pm)

Kristen Harmon

This presentation builds on my previous and ongoing research into how past and present Deaf authors (especially Deaf of Deaf) are writing creatively, using English to convey Deaf lives and languages. I will review some of the strategies previous Deaf creative writers (using Deaf family newspapers and the Buff and Blue) showed in writing Deaf lives and then will move into the present, where contemporary Deaf authors are finding ways to convey the fullness of Deaf lives and ASL/sign language on the printed page, using a variety of strategies from full gloss to full translation to a range of strategies in the middle. This presentation will discuss some of the challenges, limits, and opportunities that writing creatively in English provides for Deaf authors who sign.

Presenter Bio:
Kristen Harmon, Ph.D., is a professor of English at Gallaudet University. A Deaf author and academic, she has published both creative works (fiction) and scholarly works on a range of topics from literature to creative writing to Deaf Studies to writing for the public to ethnographic research and theory. She is series editor for Gallaudet University's Classics in Deaf Studies and has co-edited two anthologies of creative writing by Deaf authors for Gallaudet University Press (with colleague Dr. Jennifer Nelson). Some of her work on Deaf writing has been picked up by Lit Hub Daily (22 Jan. 2019). From 2010-2013, Dr. Harmon was the Communications Director for the National Science Foundation's Science of Learning Center on Visual Language and Visual Learning (VL2); while there, she wrote, directed, and co-designed the VL2 Parents Package and multiple research briefs on the advantages of bilingualism for Deaf children and infants. More details about her work can be found here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kristenharmon/

Nordic Deaf Theatre Co. Panel
Thur, 7 Nov 2019 (12:45 -1:25 pm)

Mira Zuckermann, Marita S. Barber, Mindy Drapsa

How has the process of Nordic co-production in past looked alike and how will it look alike in the future? The panel will highlight Nordic cooperation in sign language theatre, and how we adjust sign language on stage to reach an international audience to bringing an International Sign Dramaturgy to life.

The panel will also highlight the work in the field of Deaf theatre and projects with challenges and possibilities due to different organizational structure and opportunities, translational process, capacity. We learn from each other, grow and understand what specificities are for Deaf performing arts through cooperation.

Tyst Teater
Riksteatern’s Tyst Teater is a pioneer in the production of groundbreaking dramatic art in Swedish Sign Language. Ever since the start in 1970, we have offered a unique selection of dramatic arts, seminars and meetings. Tyst Teater has been part of Riksteatern since 1977.

Teater Manu
Teater Manu is a leading theatre in Europe and the only professional sign language theatre in Norway. The government grants are 2,5 million US dollars per year, for creating a touring, high-quality, sign language theatre.

Teatteri Totti
Teatteri Totti is a non-profit organisation and is the only professional sign language theatre of its kind in Finland. Ministry of Education and Culture has financially supported Teatteri Totti's operation since 2006 under the cooperation of Finnish Association of the Deaf, and became an independent theatre in 2015.

Presenter Bio:
Mindy Drapsa, Sweden
Mindy Drapsa is Artistic Director of Riksteaterns Tyst Teater and have been a part of Tyst Teater’s team since 2017. In Sweden Mindy Drapsa is also well known as co-founder of Dramaski where she still is president. Mindy Drapsa has BA in linguistics and is vice president of SIMA, a Swedish collage.

Mira Zuckermann, Norway
Mira Zuckermann is a Norwegian-Israeli actor and director. Since 2001, Zuckermann have been theatre manager for the professional Norwegian sign language theatre, Teater Manu. With 13 directed plays and 13 performances as actress, she is well known by the deaf audiences.

Since the start up in 2001, Teater Manu have been nominated six times for the National theatre award (Hedda award). One of the nominations was for the play “Pinocchio”, which was directed by Zuckermann. Teater Manu also won the award for the best audio-visual play for “Jack and the Beanstalk”, also directed by Zuckermann.

Marita S. Barber, Finland
Artistic Director Marita S. Barber graduated in Theatre Arts, BA and Media minor of BA from Gallaudet University and in Manager minor MBA from Probana 2017. Marita got different awards in shows and art works, like Josep Velez's Award from National Theatre of the Deaf 1989, the year of the best actress 1996 and the year of the best director 1995 at Gallaudet University. Medal for Merit award in Finnish Accociation of the Deaf´s 100th Anniversary in 2007. Marita was one of founders for Living Hands- company. Marita has been teaching drama and poetry in Finland, Uganda, Namibia, Tansania, Mosambik, Etiopia, Brazilia, etc. Marita is well known by in deaf community in Finland throught by her visit in media. Also, Marita is an actress and director. Marita received the honorary invitation for cultural well-being of society and community service from President of the Republic of Finland to celebrate Finland's independence in 2015.

Documenting Deaf NYC Stories
Thur, 7 Nov 2019 (1:30 – 2:50 pm)

Brian H. Greenwald and Brianna DiGiovanni

This presentation will focus on collecting and documenting Deaf NYC stories. This multiyear project aims to document diverse yet interconnected current and long-time former NYC residents. We have sought to gain an understanding of 19th and 20th century urban deaf community life. As we have worked to document the experiences of Deaf New Yorkers across race, generational, and borough boundaries, we hope to gain an understanding of this community. This presentation explores the different ways of gathering information through narrative (interviews) history, primary source material, and mapping deaf spaces in New York City. These approaches help us learn more about the largest urban deaf community in the United States during the mid-20th century.

Presenter Bio:
Brian H. Greenwald, PhD is professor of history and Director of the Drs. John S. and Betty J. Schuchman Deaf Documentary Center at Gallaudet University. He is co-editor of A Fair Chance in the Race of Life: The Role of Gallaudet University in Deaf History and In Our Own Hands: Essays in Deaf History, 1780-1970. Brian has presented widely on many topics on American Deaf history. Currently, he is co-director (with Jean L. Bergey) of the Deaf NYC: Signs of Change project that explores deaf life in New York City during the late 19th and 20th centuries.

Brianna DiGiovanni is a fourth-year student at Gallaudet University, where she is pursuing a degree in History. She is a student research assistant at the Drs. John S. and Betty J. Schuchman Deaf Documentary Center. She is currently working on the Deaf NYC: Signs of Change project that explores deaf life in New York City during the late 19th and 20th centuries. Ms. DiGiovanni has been also involved with different exhibits at the Gallaudet University Archives and Deaf Collections. Upon completion of her undergraduate studies, she intends to apply to graduate school to further her knowledge of history and teaching, and progress toward a career as a history teacher.

Golden Years for Deaf Lesbians? An Exploration of Deaf Lesbian Options in Life’s Last Chapter
Thur, 7 Nov 2019 (1:30 – 2:50 pm)

Bridget Klein

Deaf lesbians and gay men over 60 have paved the path for us to be out today. For most of their lives, they have experienced stigma, marginalization and a strict adherence to so-called normalcy. These struggles have been revealed with the help of several theories including: CRIP theory, stigma theory and intersectionality identity theory. Gleaned from life story interviews, Deaf woman share their experiences with stigma, passing, and resistance. Given that they have paved the path for youth LGBTQA like us, how do we honor the last chapter of their lives?

Presenter Bio:
Bridget Klein joined the ASL/English Interpreting Program at Bloomsburg University faculty in 2013. She graduated with a Bachelor’s degree from Keuka College, focusing on ASL in 2003. In 2004, Ms. Klein enrolled at Gallaudet University and graduated with two masters; the first one was in teaching sign language (2006) and the second was in Deaf cultural studies (2007). She also graduated with a certificate in Deaf History. Currently, Ms. Klein is ABD at American University completing her doctoral study in anthropology. Her dissertation analyzes anthropological stories of older Deaf lesbian women’s intersectionality identities from 1950s to today.

Yours Most Sincerely: A Study of the Friendship of a Nineteenth-Century Deaf-Mute Artist and Prominent Political Couple
Thur, 7 Nov 2019 (1:30 – 2:50 pm)

Corinna Hill

How did deaf and hearing people communicate with each other in the nineteenth century? How did deaf people befriend hearing people? Was there a sense of egalitarianism within those cross-cultural friendships? The relationship between John Carlin and the family of William Henry Seward helps us analyze those questions and this presentation will discuss the physical artifacts of their relationship. Their letters and a hand written conversation from 1842 expand and challenge our perception of how hearing people befriended and interacted with deaf people in the nineteenth century.

Presenter Bio:
Corinna Hill is a lecturer in the Deaf Cultural and Creative Studies department at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf and a PhD student in the history department at the University of Rochester and. She studies deafness, disability, and women in the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Two Nations, Sign Languages and Sexes but One Shared Identity: Signed Poetry on Intersectionality of Deaf Queer African
Thur, 7 Nov 2019 (3:45 – 4:15 pm)

Rezenet Moges Riedel​

This talk will cover a phenomenology of an unplanned signed poetic collaboration of three bodies who are all identified as Black Deaf Queer Africans. Two South Africans and an Eritrean-American gathered up during a class with a topic covering “Deaf Lesbians and Gay Men” at an university in Johannesburg, South Africa. The actors were not prepared but formed a “renga,” which is a collaborative poem created with multiple poets. The renga was led by the local Deaf gay poet/archivist, John Meletse whose poem “Rainbow” (Morgan & Meletse, 2017) with a Queer theme. This performance is a cripping practice, a process of reclaiming their intersectionality with disabled and queer bodies (Moges, 2017). Our poem is titled as "TROUSER 2, DRESS 1" perpetuating gender issues between masculinity and femininity. Finally, this talk will explore the negotiations of multiple cultural values and the impacts of signed literature by increasing Deaf Queer scholarship.

Presenter Bio:
As a CSU-Long Beach alumnus, Rezenet Moges-Riedel returns there as a full-time Lecturer in ASL Linguistics and Deaf Cultures program. She graduated with Masters in Linguistic Anthropology after studying about sign language contact in her family country, Eritrea, located in east Africa. Her last publications are based on Deaf Queer, using crip theory and a new concept “Demissionization” that concentrates on an aftermath of language purism, dissociating from missionization. Currently, she is a Doctoral Candidate studying at CSU, Northridge about Deaf Faculty of Color and working on re-framing Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality with Deaf lens.

Contribution of Black Deaf Performing Arts
Thur, 7 Nov 2019 (4:15 – 4:45 pm)

Fred Beam

This presentation will include the history of black deaf performing arts, black deaf performing artists and their accomplishments in theater. Also, presented will be a list of "Firsts" in the field of Black Deaf Performing Arts.

The contributions of “Black Deaf” Performing Arts offers insights into the Deaf Community and African American Community. Historically, Deaf people have focused on the majority-- Deaf people who are non minority--while African Americans typically ignore Deaf people. Black Deaf Performing Artists look at themselves as not just deaf or black , but as whole people--"Black Deaf". Portrayals of Deaf African Americans are for all of us because issues of identity, culture, and language are related to the experiences of all individuals who have wondered who they are and to every group that have felt “ invisible” in the eyes of our country.

Presenter Bio:
Fred Michael Beam is Outreach Coordinator for Sunshine 2.0 .He has worked as acclaimed professional dancer, actor, director, choreographer, ASL Director and playwright for numerous dance concerts and theater nationally and internationally. He has performed around the globe including Africa, Australia, Egypt, England, and France among others. He was a member of “I Didn’t Hear That Color,” the first black deaf play ever produced. His television and film credits include “If You Could Hear My Own Tune,” “The West Wing,” “Secret Dream,” “Little Lonely Monster, and “The New Captain Kangaroo, “ for which he won the 2000 Media Access Award. He has served as the director of Invisible Hands, Inc., which promotes deaf awareness through performing arts. He was a founding member of the Wild Zappers, an all deaf male dance company. He also established Theatre Arts Leadership Training for Deaf People of Color at Gallaudet University.

“Do It For the Culture”: A Critical Look Into The Evolving BlackDeaf Expressions in Written English
Fri, 8 Nov 2019 (9:15 – 10:30 am)

Kristi Merriweather

This presentation will highlight certain synthesized cultural features in BlackDeaf word art/lit and their potential impact in the multifaceted Deaf World. “Do It for The Culture” is a relatively new tagline, proposing an external or internal challenge for us to “carry out a specific action for the benefit of our shared culture.” For a long time, BlackDeaf voices have been largely silent in Deaf literature which also is mirrored in other creative mediums. This presentation will touch upon how semi-invisibility ties into both the lived and written narratives of BlackDeaf experiences and being. It will also explore both potential and actual inclusion of certain cultural features in BlackDeaf word art/literature.

Presenter Bio:
Kristi Merriweather is an educator and Deaf Learning Specialist by profession. Deaf since age 2, she was a prolific reader who attended schools under Atlanta Public Schools from elementary to high school. She is a graduate of Spelman, Howard, and Georgia State University with degrees in psychology and Deaf Education. A few of her poems have been published in Deaf American Poetry: An Anthology. Her community service has involved Delta Sigma Theta Sorority and Georgia Association of the Deaf and she is a co-founding member of Atlanta Tribe of Deaf A.C.E. (DeafBlack Americans Committed to Empowerhood) and established a national youth program for BlackDeaf teenagers for National Black Deaf Advocates, which is still in existence 22 years later.

De'VIA: Understanding the Themes and Motifs
Fri, 8 Nov 2019 (11:00 – 11:30 am)

Nancy Rourke

De'VIA artists create art in many forms which express what they see, think and feel—often resulting in an artwork communicating a collective consciousness—frequently occurring themes or motifs. These themes and motifs have been analyzed and utilized in De’VIA art challenges and in the development of a K-12 De’VIA curriculum for schools. In particular, teaching De’VIA motifs can promote identity explorations through art and can lead to the creation of new motifs. In addition, exhibiting De’VIA artworks can spark a critical analysis of themes and motifs which can awaken Deaf cultural resistance to oppression and affirmation of Deaf culture.

Presenter Bio:
Nancy Rourke is an internationally-known Deaf artist and activist. As a full-time professional artist, she is involved implementing De'VIA art curriculum for Deaf children. Deaf View/Image Art, also known as De’VIA, is art that examines and expresses the Deaf experience from a cultural, linguistic, and intersectional point of view. She does artist-in-residencies at Deaf schools nationwide where she teaches and makes art in Rourkeism De’VIA. This is a style of De’VIA, modeled after her work, and noteworthy for its use of bold primary colors and Deaf-themes expressing affirmation, resistance and liberation. Nancy offers De'VIA retreats, hosts art galleries for Deaf artists, and raises awareness of Deaf people through Art. A book about her work is entitled "Nancy Rourke: Deaf Artist Series” and she illustrated the portraits appearing in "ABC Portraits of Deaf Ancestors," written by Karen Christie.

Highlighting Intersectional Deafnicity: From Theory, to Experience, to Literature
Fri, 8 Nov 2019 (11:30 – 12:00 pm)

Rachel Mazique

This talk seeks to highlight the multiple intersectional ethnic identifications that Deaf people of color may experience. Starting from the theorization of Deafnicity, I move to feature the significantly underresearched topic of intersectional experiences of Deaf people of color. I will discuss how the conceptualization of Deafnicity is not to erase or overpower Sign Language Peoples’ (SLPs) multiple ethnic or racial identities for the sake of a unifying power among SLPs.

This analysis of the tensions between Deafnicity and intersectionality will move from the academic theorizations of the concepts to Moges’ (2016) and my own personal experiences of “DEAF-SAME,” or Deafnicity—even with our respective intersectional identities. This talk seeks, in the end, to tie theory and the experiences of several intersectional Deaf scholars who have written on the topic, to highlighting fiction and nonfiction stories and poems written by intersectional Deaf authors.

Presenter Bio:
Rachel Mazique is an Assistant Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology who specializes in Deaf literature, Deaf studies, and disability studies. As the latter two fields are interdisciplinary, Mazique’s research interests are also interdisciplinary and include cognitive approaches to literary studies, research in human rights, as well as theories of ethnicity. Her presentation on “Intersectional Deafnicity” draws from and expands on a portion of her dissertation, Transatlantic Deaf Literature and the Human and Group Rights Claims of Sign Language Peoples. By examining the portrayal of Deaf ethnicity, or “Deafnicity,” in transatlantic Deaf literature, her work asks how this literature engages “rights” discourses, including disability rights, human rights, group rights, as well as bioethical issues.

Dr. Mazique teaches First Year Writing Seminar and Critical Reading and Writing to students of the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. More recently, she has proposed a new course, “Literatures of Intersectionality.”

TDG LOL: Teaching Deaf Culture through Humor
Fri, 8 Nov 2019 (1:30 – 2:50 pm)

Matt Daigle

Visual art is one of the best story-telling tools in the classroom and what better way to tell a story but through cartoons? Cartoons are colorful, funny, and drive the point home. Matt Daigle, the co-creator of “That Deaf Guy” uses his own comic strip as a teaching tool with very successful results.

Teaching Deaf culture to students can be very tricky. That is why Matt decided to show, rather than tell, students about Deaf culture. What better way than through a funny cartoon to explain to a hearing person that over-enunciating to deaf people doesn’t really help them read lips? Humor can be used to teach hearing students that their values, norms, and priorities are not always shared by the Deaf community.. Matt will show how to use cartoons and visual storytelling to engage students and enhance ASL and Deaf culture studies.

Presenter Bio:
Matt Daigle is an award winning Deaf and partially sighted artist who is best known for his popular webcomic “That Deaf Guy”. For the past 25 years, Matt has worked in a variety of artistic settings as a cartoonist, illustrator, and graphic designer and as a national speaker.

Matt has received numerous art awards throughout the years most notably being invited to present at the Edmund Lyon Memorial Lectureship Series at RIT in 2012 and receiving the graduate of the Last Decade (G.O.L.D.) Alumni Award from his alma mater Northern State University in 2011.

Since 2016, Matt has worked with Sorenson Communications as a graphic artist creating the popular Buzzstickers, and as an ASL instructor at California State University, Northridge. In July 2019, he graduated with a Masters in Sign Language Education from Gallaudet University.

Matt lives in Burbank, California, with his wife, Kay, and son, Hayden.

Justin Perez's Visual Vernacular
Fri, 8 Nov 2019 (1:30 – 2:50 pm)

Justin Perez

Visual Vernacular (VV) is a diverse, expressive mode of communication using gesture for storytelling in American Sign Language (ASL). Visual Vernacular includes techniques such as: long shot, fast/slow motion, zoom, panoramic view, role shifting and many more. Justin Perez will provide examples and explain how these features enhance storytelling ability.

Presenter Bio:
Justin Perez was born and raised in Houston, Texas. He was a student at Texas School for the Deaf. He has always been fascinated by American Sign Language (ASL) performance art and storytelling styles. Throughout his teenage years, he had incredibly deep bonds with several of his close friends who also enjoyed sharing a variety of ASL stories, and that was where he defined numerous storytelling techniques along with sign language expressions. Repeated requests to share his storytelling became the fuel to his passion, creativity, and innovative persona--pushing new ASL performance boundaries and art. Justin has been a Vernacular (VV) teacher at Texas School for the Deaf, ASL tutor at National Technical Institute of the Deaf, ASL model and expert with TRUE+WAY ASL curriculum. Most recently, he won the ASL Elements national ASL competition with his fan favorite, a Super Mario Kart story.

From Deaf Eyes: Photography As A Visual Storyteller
Fri, 8 Nov 2019 (1:30 – 2:50 pm)

Orkid Sassouni

This presentation will showcase selected d/Deaf photographers who have created unique projects—from empty-looking room images to full naked body or figurine portraits--with works in black and white, color, and/or mixed media images. While photography is an everyday tool as a way to communicate with the world, many photographers look for subjects that have meaning from subtle to deep. Some of these topics focus on d/Deaf people and others with objects, like flowers, landscape, street life, etc. Some just to capture the moment. These photographers use photography as a visual tool to tell stories to the audience. Some photographers use this type of medium to represent their true identity as relevant to everyday life or situations.

Presenter Bio:
Orkid Sassouni works as a Library Technical Assistant at the SFPL’s Deaf Services Center. She is a member of the Access Advisor at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco. Ms. Sassouni is an ASL gallery lecturer, first at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, in NYC, for ten years and later with the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco. She is a council member for Mayor’s Disability Council under Mayor's Office of Disability focusing on accessibility issues within City Departments and public spaces. Ms. Sassouni began developing her photography skills while a student at Gallaudet University. She graduated with a BA degree in Art History & Museum Studies. Later, Ms. Sassouni studied Studio Photography at Parsons School of Design. She worked on her documentary photography project called Being Deaf and Free Spirit for more than two years which was exhibited and traveled for two years all across the United States.

Journey of ASL Literature and Deaf Art in Digital Media
Fri, 8 Nov 2019 (1:30 – 2:50 pm)

Ruthie Jordan

This presentation will demonstrate how Deaf artists are influenced by Sign Lit, Deaf Cinema, Deaf Theatre, and their language to express works creatively and artistically. Included will be a discussion of language in various art forms such as gender in arts and empowerment in arts. Additionally, I will explain how recognition of symbols/motifs in Deaf experiences and of the intersectionality in ASL Literature and Deaf arts can be applied in a Digital Media format.

Presenter Bio:
Ruthie “Eyepoetic” Jordan is an ASL Literature consultant, educator, filmmaker, and creative artist. My journey took me in many directions after college, and I am truly grateful for the seeds that were planted by those experiences that influenced and nourished my soul as a member of both the Deaf and Hearing communities. I’m passionate about sharing a creative language through various art forms which will inspire the next generation of Deaf people. “Sign Language is our voice of the soul”-Ruthie Jordan

Making of an Epic in American Sign Language: Tapping into Martha's Vineyard to Shed New Light on Deaf Storytelling
Fri, 8 Nov 2019 (3:45 – 4:15 pm)

Samuel J. Supalla and Andrew Byrne

This presentation will focus on "Martha's Vineyard," a one hour and ten minutes ASL epic created and performed by Dr. Samuel J. Supalla. Some of the challenges associated with the epic's creation will be discussed along with an elaboration on the essentials of an ASL epic and how it produces rich opportunities for literary criticism and learning in a classroom setting.

Drs. Byrne and Supalla will address the value of promoting intersectionality of different experiences for Deaf people assigners when it comes to Martha's Vineyard and the American mainland. Social issues associated with how to best combat audism affecting Deaf Americans and for many parts of the world will be addressed with possible solutions as inherent to the "Martha's Vineyard" epic. A short video clip will be shown confirming both the aesthetic and literary value of ASL and the story's content as historically and socially informative.

Presenter Bio:
Sam Supalla began telling stories as a boy to his peers at Oregon School for the Deaf, then winning a national award for his work at the age of 14. He went on to publish the ASL Literature Series with Ben Bahan in 1992. Over the years, Sam has evolved as a performer and felt compelled to create the ultimate "Deaf experience" in his newest story. Being employed as a professor at the University of Arizona has allowed Sam to do research and development work with ASL literature. Dr. Supalla is currently the President of the Society for ASL organization. Sam's inspiration for "Martha's Vineyard" comes from his deep commitment to literacy, and continually striving to better understand how signers can find their rightful place in society. Signers encompass the essence of Deaf people at their core, which will promote diversity, differences, and inclusiveness across society.

Born to Deaf parents, Canada, Dr. Andrew Byrne attended the Sir James Whitney School for the Deaf in Belleville, Ontario. He earned a B.A. in History from Gallaudet University, an M.Sc. in Deaf Education from McDaniel College, and a Ph.D. in Education: Language, Culture, and Teaching from York University. Dr. Byrne has been a teacher for 26 years in Canada and the United States teaching at the E. C. Drury School for the Deaf in Milton, Ontario, York University, McDaniel College, the Hawaii School for the Deaf and the Blind, the University of Hawaii at Moana, Lamar University, and Framingham State University. Currently, he is a clinical assistant professor/director of the ASL program at the University at Buffalo. Dr. Byrne is the recording secretary and the newsletter editor of the Society for American Sign Language (SASL). His current areas of interest are literary genre studies, ASL literary criticism, and the canon of ASL literary works.

What are the ties between the film industry and us?
Fri, 8 Nov 2019 (4:15 – 4:45 pm)

David de Keyzer

This is a presentation of my experiences through Cinema in which I have worked for some films. Through these experiences, I will introduce my personal observation of Cinema in relation to our community.

Presenter Bio:
David de Keyzer is a recognized personality in the world of the Deaf for its dynamism and its way of defending the Deaf Culture in France and in the world.

Having grown up in the world of image, he became an actor from IVT (International Visual Theater) and then video assistant in film and finally director.

Since 2005, he made several documentary films for the french emission « L’Oeil et la Main » in the Channel France 5.

In 2000 he created the company CinéSourds whose primary objective is to distribute DVD documentary films and theater recordings. The association then proposed cafes theaters, amateur workshops, etc ... and organizes every 2 years the Clin d’œil Festival in Reims.

In 2003, David founded the International Clin d'Oeil Festival, aimed to defend the creation and expression of deaf artists in all artistic fields.

Anthology of Poetics in Brazilian Sign Language
Sat, 9 Nov 2019 (9:15 – 10:30 am)

Fernanda de Araugo Machado

Fernanda de Araújo Machado’s presentation focuses on her doctoral thesis project which is the creation and analysis of an anthology of poetry in Brazilian Sign Language (Libras). Following a careful and thorough investigation and collection process, the Anthology features beautiful poetic productions of various styles produced by Deaf authors highly proficient in sign language. Their poems are analyzed in terms of characteristics, stylistics, profiles, senses, contents, influences, themes, and patterns. Additionally, attention is paid to the context of publication and the poetic elements including: rhythm, rhyme, repetition, verse, symmetry, neologism, replacement of lexical sign, and use of differentiated language. Deaf authors further share reflections about their works. This Anthology records poetic productions in Libras preserved in video similar to records of poetic productions in written language.

Presenter Bio:
Fernanda de Araújo Machado is a professor and researcher at the Federal University of Santa Catarina. She holds a degree in Arts Education (2009) from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and a degree in Letras (LIBRAS) (2011). Additionally, she holds a Master's Degree in Translation Studies (2013) from the Federal University of Santa Catarina. Since 2006-2008, she has been a member of the research group for the Research Project, Teaching and Extension Laboratory in LIBRAS, Faculty of Arts, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). Prof. Machado coordinates the creation of the Anthology of Poetry in LIBRAS. She is part of the Libras Corpus Research Group (2014-current) and a member of the CNPQ Research Group Directory, whose leader is Prof. Ronice Müller de Quadros. She is currently a PhD student in the Postgraduate Program in Translation Studies at UFSC under the guidance of Prof. Ronice de Muller Quadros and Prof. Rachel Sutton-Spence. She has made visits to California State University Northridge (CSUN), the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), and California School for the Deaf in Fremont (CSDF) consulting with Prof. Dr. Flavia Fleischer, a professor and researcher in the area of Deaf Studies. Prof. Machado coordinated the Brazilian Folkore Surda Art Festival (2014 and 2016-current), with funding from the Ministry of Culture, with Prof. Rachel Sutton-Spence, which included various types of literary manifestations in LIBRAS.

Political Artivism through Deaf Lenses
Sat, 9 Nov 2019 (11:00 – 11:30 am)

Amy Cohen Efron

This presentation will emphasize the importance of bringing art with Deaf experience and lenses to the political arena. It will include an introduction to artivism and its history, purposes and intentions of combining art and activism for social change. Historical examples will show how Deaf people used their De'VIA artwork for systematic change and challenging the system which oppresses Deaf people. Further, I will explore a new way of presenting more specific Political/Deaf-centric artwork to make a larger social change and influence perspectives.

My art is about my Deaf experience and is a constant search for the best way to interpret the absurdity, resistance, and celebration I experience everyday. I try addressing controversial themes and raising thought-provoking questions through art. I believe advertising imagery, with hidden messages, bold colors, strong lines, and symbolism, serve as significant influences in my art. It is my goal for creating art as an agent for social change.

Presenter Bio:
I was born Deaf, and all of my childhood life; I dabbled in different art mediums to express my innermost thoughts and feelings. This was the only way that I could effectively communicate. I minored in Studio Art, while\majoring in Psychology \at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C.

I started my professional career as a school psychologist in 1992, and I worked for a non-profit organization, several state schools for the Deaf, and a residential treatment center for Deaf children for 25 years. In 2006, I founded my website, Deaf World As Eye See It. I published approximately 120 written posts, and produced more than 140 ASL videos covering a wide range of Deaf-related subjects.

My artworks have been displayed at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri, the Mammal Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia, The Studio Door in San Diego, California, and the Dyer Arts Center in Rochester, New York.

The Rise of Aesthetics and Intersectionality in Signed Language Performance Arts: Poetry and Music in Valli's "Dandelion"
Sat, 9 Nov 2019 (11:30 – 12:00 pm)

Jody Cripps

The historical and largely underappreciated evidence on how Deaf people have generated songs entirely in ASL suggests a re-evaluation regarding the concept of music. In this presentation, Dr. Cripps will review the historical context of music concerning Deaf people and move on to the concept of signed music and its influence on Valli's poetic work "Dandelion". The principles of aesthetics along with an understanding of the categories of aesthetics will be identified for all literary works under study. The audience will be introduced to culturally authentic musical material as created by a rapidly growing group of Deaf musicians. This will serve as a preparation for understanding how music interacts with poetry in Valli's "Dandelion". Dr. Cripps will emphasize the fundamental elements of aesthetics, poetry, and music in analyzing "Dandelion". In the end, it is expected that the audience will both understand and appreciate the ongoing evolution of signed language performance arts.

Presenter Bio:
Dr. Jody H. Cripps is an Assistant Professor of American Sign Language in the Department of Languages at Clemson University. His doctorate in the Second Language Acquisition and Teaching program is from the University of Arizona. Dr. Cripps’ research interests primarily focus on universal design, signed music, signed language pathology, ASL-English literacy and the pedagogical methods. Dr. Cripps' latest grant allows for conducting ground-breaking ethnomusicological research on a signed music showcase titled, "THE BLACK DRUM", performed by a signing musical theater troupe. This first of its kind musical incorporates Dr. Cripps' signed music theories and will be featured at Clin d'Oeil in France. Dr. Cripps also serves as the Editor-in-Chief for the Society for American Sign Language Journal and the Vice President of The Gloss Institute, a non-profit organization providing educators and parents the necessary tools and resources to overcome the habitually low literacy (English) rates in deaf children.

Anderson Center for Interdisciplinary Studies—Deaf Artists Residency Program
Sat, 9 Nov 2019 (1:30 – 2:50 pm)

Cynthia Weitzel

In this panel session, Deaf Artists Residency Program alumni share their experiences and perspectives while moderated by artist and program coordinator, Cynthia Weitzel. Anyone interested in learning more about Deaf-friendly residencies (or residencies in general) will benefit from this session. How they differ, inform and inspire while serving as catalyst in the careers of most.

Established in 2014 and funded by National Endowment for the Arts, the Deaf Artists Residency Program has become a strong example for barrier-free, Deaf-friendly residency based on common language and culture. The month-long residency, based within an interdisciplinary residency center known as the Anderson Center in Red Wing, Minnesota, has just one minimum requirement for qualified Deaf applicants—native or adoptive language must be American Sign Language. The program is open to both emerging and established professional artists (visual, literary, performing) and scholars (academics within the arts, humanities, sciences) based in the U.S.

Presenter Bio:
Cynthia Weitzel is a Deaf visual artist who since 2011 has maintained a year-round studio at the Anderson Center at Tower View in Red Wing, Minnesota. Her work involves the continuum of visual art media with primary focus on themes relating to the Deaf life experience. She attended Gallaudet University and University of Minnesota before obtaining her BBA in business management and studio fine art from Austin Peay State University. In collaboration with the Anderson Center she founded the interdisciplinary Deaf Artists Residency Program supported by ArtWorks Grants (2014, 2016 and 2018) from the National Endowment for the Arts. And most recently was selected by the Alliance of Artist Communities to receive the 2018-2019 Diversity & Leadership Fellowship funded by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Embodying Theory in the Classroom: Politics, Poetics and Pedagogy
Sat, 9 Nov 2019 (3:45 – 4:15 pm)

Dirksen Bauman and Douglas Ridloff

This presentation explores the dialogic relationship between pedagogy and poetics, based on the collaborative work of ASL poet, Douglas Ridloff and Deaf Studies scholar, Dirksen Bauman. Together they will discuss their process and show the final product of a series of ASL poems composed during the course, “Enforcing Normalcy: Deaf and Disability Studies” in Gallaudet Deaf Studies MA program. They will reflect on the ways in which such transdisciplinary work expands on the potential uses of poetics as a means of teaching theory and history; and, in addition the ways in which pedagogy and curriculum may serve as a wellspring of source material for cultural production. The ultimate integration of pedagogy and poetics is a political act--of giving “voice” to the long history of ableism and audism, and what’s more--to forms of resistance through the performing Deaf body.

Presenter Bio:
H-Dirksen L. Bauman is Professor of Deaf Studies at Gallaudet University where he serves as coordinator of the Deaf Studies MA Program. He is the co-editor of the book/DVD project, Signing the Body Poetic: Essays in American Sign Language (U of California P, 2006); editor of Open Your Eyes: Deaf Studies Talking (U of Minnesota P, 2008); co-editor of Deaf-Gain: Raising the Stakes for Human Diversity (U of Minnesota P, 2014) and co-author of Transformative Conversations: Mentoring Communities among Colleagues in Higher Education (Jossey Bass, 2013). He is the founding editor of the Deaf Studies Digital Journal, executive producer and director of the film, Audism Unveiled.

Douglas Ridloff is a poet and visual storyteller creating original works in Sign Language. He is the owner, executive director and host of ASL SLAM (www.aslslam.com) a monthly open mic event in NYC and now has been established as a monthly event in Washington DC, Chicago and Orlando. Recently, Douglas has organized performances at the Whitney Museum, the Jewish Museum, SITE Santa Fe and the 9/11 Memorial Museum, and has traveled to perform his own poetry and to bring ASL SLAM to Deaf communities around the world, including Jamaica, Cuba, Finland, England, Sweden and Australia. Ridloff has given a TEDx talk in Vienna in 2018. He has worked as an ASL consultant for film and TV with the likes of John Kraskinsky, Emily Blunt, Sam Rockwell, Donald Glover and Anthony Edwards. Douglas has been featured in NBC NEWS, Circa, HBO Vice, and CNN’s Great Big Story for his work.

Screening of "Signing Black in America"
Sat, 9 Nov 2019 (4:15 – 4:45 pm)

Joseph Hill

Signing Black in America, produced by the Language & Life Project of North Carolina State University (with Walt Wolfram, Executive Producer; Danica Cullican and Neal Hutcheson, Co-Producers and Co-Directors; and Joseph Hill, Ceil Lucas, and Carolyn McCaskill, Associate Producers), is the first documentary to highlight the development of Black American Sign Language. Based on extensive interviews with Black signers, linguistic experts, interpreters, natural conversations, and artistic performances by Black ASL users, it documents the development and description of this unique variety of ASL. Different uses of space, directional movement, and facial expression are exemplified by Black ASL users, including a larger signing space for hand movement, the use of two-handed vs. one-handed signs, facial expressions, and borrowing from spoken African American Language leading to a variety of ASL in a way that is similar to the variety used in spoken African American Language. The Black Deaf Community is now embracing the notion of Black ASL as a symbol of solidarity and agency in constructing ethnolinguistic identity.

Presenter Bio:
Dr. Joseph C. Hill is an assistant professor in the Department of American Sign Language and Interpreting Education in the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology. His research interests include socio-historical and -linguistic aspects of African-American variety of American Sign Language and attitudes and ideologies about signing varieties in the American Deaf community. His contributions include The Hidden Treasure of Black ASL: Its History and Structure (2011) which he co-authored with Carolyn McCaskill, Ceil Lucas, and Robert Bayley and Language Attitudes in the American Deaf Community (2012).

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Service Bridges, Inc. is an approved RID CMP sponsor for continuing education activities. Each day’s program is offered to CMP/ACET participants for 0.6 CEUs/day in the Linguistic & Cultural Studies area of Professional Studies at the some Content Knowledge Level. Partial units will not be awarded (i.e. 0.2 for attending morning session) and participants will receive a certificate of attendance. Contact Service Bridges at access@servicebridges.com for cancellation policy.

 


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