Course Descriptions

INTP-120 - American Sign Language I

ASL I includes linguistic features, cultural protocols and core vocabulary for students to function in basic ASL conversations that include ASL grammar for asking and answering questions while introducing oneself, exchanging personal information, talking about family, friends and surroundings, and discussing activities. This course is designed for students who have no knowledge of American Sign Language. To progress to the next ASL course in the series (INTP-125), students must complete the course with a minimum grade of C. (This course is restricted to ASLINT-BS Major students.) Lab 5, Lecture, Credits 4 (Fall)

INTP-125 - American Sign Language II

This course expands the basic principles presented in ASL I. ASL II teaches students to use linguistics features, cultural protocols and core vocabulary to function in basic ASL conversations that include ASL grammar for giving directions, describing, making request, talking about family, occupations and routines, and attributing qualities to others. To progress to the next course in the series (INTP-126), students must complete the course with a minimum grade of C. (Prerequisites: INTP-120 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C- and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lab, Lecture 5, Credits 4 (Fall)

INTP-126 - American Sign Language III

This course builds upon information taught in ASL I-II and introduces expanded grammatical features of ASL and specialized vocabulary, while continuing to increase fingerspelling and numbers receptive and expressive skills. In addition, some basic features of ASL discourse are taught in organizing and explaining contextual information. To progress to the next course in the series (INTP-225), students must complete the course with a minimum grade of C. (Prerequisites: INTP-125 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C- and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lab, Lecture 5, Credits 4 (Spring)

INTP-200 - Deaf Expressions

Students will explore the historical, philosophical, linguistic, social, cultural, educational, medical and artistic past, present, and future of deaf/Deaf/hard-of-hearing people. This course uses an on-line format to discuss concepts and perspectives found in the assigned book(s) and visual media (e.g. film, television programs, etc,). Each time the course is offered the book and visual media will be different so students may take this course multiple times. Books/media will be chosen from areas with relevance to Deaf Culture and community, such as D/deaf literature and the Arts, D/deaf history, D/deaf issues, significant D/deaf people, and ASL. This course is repeatable for credit. (This course is restricted to ASLINT-BS Major students.) Lecture 2, Credits 1 (Fall, Spring)

INTP-210 - Introduction to the Field of Interpreting

This survey course is the introduction to the profession of sign language interpreting, with a focus on the role, function, and responsibilities of an interpreter. Information about the history of the profession, professional organizations, and settings where interpreters work is presented. Additional topics include the function of assessing as part of the interpreting process, with a focus on Demand/Control Schema. To progress to INTP-220 students must complete course with a minimum grade of C. (This course is restricted to ASLINT-BS Major students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)

INTP-215 - Processing Skills Development

This course is an introduction to the mental processing skills (pre-interpreting skills) of consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. This course includes an overview of the theoretical models of interpretation, provides skill development activities for isolated interpreting sub-tasks and practice activities for the integration of these tasks in translation and consecutive interpreting activities. Course content includes interpreting theory, message analysis, text analysis, visualization, listening and comprehension, shadowing, paraphrasing, dual task training, text analysis. To progress to (INTP-310) students must complete the course with a grade of C or better. (Prerequisite: INTP-126 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C- and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-220 - Discourse Analysis

This course presents an introductory look at the interpreter as a bicultural/bilingual mediator, at the center of communicative activity. The interpreter's success requires the analysis of how communication (spoken, written, signed) is structured so that it is socially appropriate and linguistically accurate. This course includes an introduction to significant linguistic features and the analysis of conversational exchanges in English and ASL, focusing on the practical application of analyzing discourse. (Prerequisites: INTP-126 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C- and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS. Co-requisite: INTP-225 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-225 - American Sign Language IV

This course builds upon information taught in ASL I-III. Students continue learning and using ASL vocabulary, grammatical principles and various intermediate-level discourse features in narratives and presentations in ASL. Students analyze multiple meaning English words and English idioms to express concepts in ASL. Issues related to Deaf culture continue to be introduced based on unit topics. To progress to the next courses in the series (INTP-215, INTP-220 and INTP-226), students must complete the course with a minimum grade of C. (Prerequisites: INTP-126 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C- and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lab, Lecture 4, Credits 3 (Fall)

INTP-226 - American Sign Language V

This course builds upon information taught in ASL VI. Students continue learning and using ASL vocabulary, grammatical principles and various intermediate-level discourse features in narratives and presentations in ASL. Students continue to analyze multiple meaning English words and English idioms to express concepts in ASL. Issues related to Deaf culture continue to be introduced based on unit topics. To progress to the next courses in the series (INTP-325 and INTP-310), students must complete the course with a minimum grade of C). (Prerequisites: INTP-225 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lab, Lecture 4, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

INTP-310 - Interpreting I

This course introduces the English to ASL and ASL to English interpreting process with a focus on text analysis and consecutive production of an equivalent message in the target language. Compression and expansion strategies are introduced. Students develop interpreting management strategies and diagnostic assessment skills. Students will interpret inquiry and narrative texts in monologue and dialogue formats. Warm-up exercises will be performed as part of the self-care regimen recommended for sign language interpreters. To progress to INTP-335 Interpreting II: English to ASL and INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English, students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C. (Prerequisites: INTP-215 with a minimum grade of C- and (INTP-226 or 0875-303 with a minimum grade of C) or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)

INTP-315 - Practical and Ethical Applications

This course presents the underlying principles of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Code of Professional Conduct and applies the Code to the various situations and settings. Students will explore how professional interpreters apply these principles in their daily work and how consumers perceive the ethical role and function of interpreters. In addition, etiquette and protocol for each setting will be discussed. Settings include: K-12, post-secondary, religious, healthcare, mental health, deaf-blind, performing arts, and business and industry. To progress to INTP-350 Practicum and Seminar I, students must complete course with a minimum grade of C. (Prerequisites: INTP-210 or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lab, Lecture 4, Credits 3 (Fall)

INTP-325 - American Sign Language VI

This course builds upon information taught in ASL I-V. Students continue learning and using ASL vocabulary, grammatical principles and various advanced-level discourse features in narratives and presentations in ASL. Students analyze different components in storytelling. ASL Literature will be introduced in this level. Students identify controversial issues in various works of ASL Literature. To progress to the next courses in the series (INTP-326, INTP-335 and INTP-336) students must complete courses with minimum grades of C. (Prerequisites: INTP-226 or 0875-303 or equivalent course with a minimum grade of C- and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lab, Lecture 4, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-326 - American Sign Language VII

This course builds upon information taught in ASL I-VI. This is the last series of ASL courses. Students continue learning and using ASL vocabulary, grammatical principles and various advanced-level discourse features in debate and public speaking in ASL. Students analyze different components in debate and public speaking. Students identify and discuss various controversial issues via debate and presentation. To progress to next courses in the sequence (INTP-435 and INTP-436) students must complete course with a minimum grade of C. (This course is restricted to ASLINT-BS Major students.) Lab, Lecture 4, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-335 - Interpreting II: English to ASL

Students develop the ability to produce an equivalent simultaneous ASL message from a spoken English source message. This course integrates inquiry and expository texts in both dialogic and monologic formats. Specific discipline areas include healthcare, employment and finance. Students will continue to develop text analysis skills applying them to simultaneous interpreting. Biomechanics and self-care issues will be discussed. To progress to the next courses in the sequence (INTP-350 and INTP-435) students must complete courses with a minimum grade of C. (Prerequisites: INTP-325 with a with a minimum grade of C- and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-336 - Interpreting II: ASL to English

Students will develop the ability to produce an equivalent English message from ASL source messages. This course integrates inquiry and expository texts in both dialogic and monologic formats. Specific content areas include healthcare, employment and finances. Students continue to develop text analysis skills, applying them to simultaneous interpreting. To progress to the next courses in the sequence (INTP-350 and INTP-436 ) students must complete courses with minimum grades of C. (Prerequisites: INTP-325 with a with a minimum grade of C- and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-340 - Interpreting Frozen and Literary Texts

This course will focus on skills and techniques for the interpretation of frozen and literary texts. Work includes translation and interpretation between English and ASL. Source English texts used in this course are the: National Anthems of USA and Canada; Lord's Prayer; Pledge of Allegiance; children's songs and poetry; patriotic songs; religious songs and prayer; AA 12 steps and 12 traditions; holiday songs; and selected poetry. (Prerequisites: (INTP-310 or (0875-315 and 0875-316)) or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lec/Lab 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-350 - Practicum and Seminar I

The student experiences a practicum placement under the immediate supervision of a professional interpreter, who functions as the student's mentor, and the seminar instructor who functions as the students' supervising instructor. The practicum will involve such activities as: observing the mentor and a variety of other interpreters at work; preparing videotapes for mentor critique; interpreting under the supervision of the mentor; and meeting weekly with the mentor to discuss the practicum experience. Additionally, practicum students will meet together, weekly, to share observations and experiences gained from the practicum placement. Class discussions focus on language issues in interpretation, application of the Code of Professional Conduct, situational concerns and protocols, and problem solving related to D-C Schema. Course requires a minimum of 135 hours of field experiences. Students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C. (For students completing the AAS degree permission of the instructor, cumulative GPA 2.5 and in good standing; INTP-315 Practical and Ethical Applications with a minimum grade of C. Co-requisite: INTP-335 Interpreting II and INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English) (For students completing the BS degree permission of the instructor, cumulative GPA 2.5 and in good standing; INTP-315 Practical and Ethical Applications, INTP-335 Interpreting II: English to ASL and INTP-336 Interpreting II: ASL to English with minimum grades of C) (This course is restricted to ASLINT-BS Major students.) Lecture 2, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

INTP-355 - Introduction to Working with the Deaf Blind Community

This course is an introduction to various perspectives of the Deaf-Blind community. The focus of the course will be on the variety of communication modes and cultural norms that are discovered within the Deaf-Blind community. Students will be able to develop an understanding of the role/function of a Support Service Provider through hands-on experience and interaction with Deaf-Blind individuals. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to at least 3rd year standing in ASLINT-BS or NTID supported students and INTP-226 or MLAS-401 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)

INTP-360 - Introduction to K-12 Interpreting

This course includes an overview of the history and current status of educational interpreting throughout the United States. Content includes the role, practices, and skills of educational interpreters in K-12 settings; communication systems; pertinent laws and regulations; resources, information, and strategies for consumer awareness and education; administrative practices and personnel structure of school systems; assessment and management of educational interpreters; and topics that concern educational interpreters. (ASLINT-BS YR 3 or 4) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)

INTP-361 - Educational Interpreting: Elementary Settings

This course is designed to prepare students to interpret in elementary school settings. Content will include an orientation to activities, elementary level content, sign vocabulary, language development, psycho-social development, and interpreting issues that are pertinent to elementary students. The course addresses strategies for interpreting classroom discourse and various content areas. Vocabulary for various elementary content areas will be introduced. Students will simultaneously interpret English-to-ASL and ASL-to-English, elementary-level texts. (Prerequisites: INTP-310 and INTP-360 or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-362 - Educational Interpreting: Middle/Secondary Settings

This course is designed to prepare students to interpret in middle and secondary school settings. Content will include orientation to the activities, middle/secondary school curriculum, sign vocabulary, language development, psycho-social development and issues pertinent to middle and secondary school students. The course also includes information about teaching methodologies and strategies for interpreting classroom discourse and various content areas. Students will learn how to prepare the middle/secondary students to request and work with interpreters. Vocabulary for various middle and secondary school content areas will be introduced. Students will also learn about interpreting for foreign language courses. Students will simultaneously interpret English-to-ASL and ASL-to-English, middle and secondary level texts. (Prerequisites: INTP-310 and INTP-360 or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-363 - Educational Interpreting: Post Secondary Settings

This course prepares students to interpret in the post-secondary setting. Students will learn preparation strategies for English-to-ASL and ASL-to-English interpreting for the following topics: computer science, advanced science and mathematics, selected liberal arts, physical education, and the instruction of a foreign language. In addition, students will become familiar with current issues facing interpreters in post-secondary settings. As part of this course, students will observe interpreters working in several types of college classrooms, (e.g. lectures, seminars, labs, and studios). (Prerequisites: (INTP-435 and INTP-436) or 0875-400 or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-399 - Independent Study: ASL-English Interpretation

The description for each independent study request will be specified in each student proposal. (This course is restricted to ASLINT-BS Major students.) Lecture, Credits 1 - 3 (Fall, Spring)

INTP-435 - Interpreting III: English to ASL

In this course students advance their skills in simultaneously producing equivalent ASL messages from spoken English source messages. Monologic, expository texts on specific topic areas will be the focus of this course. The bulk of the interpretation work in this course will take place utilizing actual speakers and audience members. Students will continue to develop their English vocabulary, ASL vocabulary, interpreting analysis skills, develop team interpreting skills and increase stamina. To progress to the next course in the sequence (INTP-450) students must complete course with a minimum grade of C. (Prerequisites: INTP-335 or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)

INTP-436 - Interpreting III: ASL to English

In this course students advance their skills in simultaneously producing equivalent spoken English messages from ASL source messages. Monologic, expository texts on specific topic areas will be the focus of this course. Students will continue to develop their English vocabulary, ASL vocabulary, interpreting analysis skills, develop team interpreting skills and increase stamina. To progress to the next course in the sequence (INTP-450) students must complete course with a minimum grade of C. (Prerequisites: INTP-336 or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)

INTP-440 - Interpreting IV:Adapting to Diverse Consumers

This course introduces the skill of transliterating simultaneously from a spoken English message into an equivalent signed message incorporating an appropriate combination of ASL and English features. The focus of the course will be the analysis of the macro- and microstructures of the source language and the production of a target language this is sensitive to contact language situations. Topics include language variation within the deaf community, role and function of a designated interpreter, the features and process of transliteration and transliteration skill development including work with frozen texts. (Prerequisites: (INTP-435 and INTP-436) or 0875-400 or equivalent course and undergraduate standing in ASLINT-BS.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-441 - Healthcare Interpreting

This course is designed to introduce students to sign language interpreting in healthcare settings through the analytical construct of Demand-Control Schema for interpreting work. The course content includes medical terminology in English and ASL. Students will learn tools and techniques to utilize while interpreting in healthcare environments with an emphasis on interactive learning including direct exposure to healthcare settings, deaf and hard-of-hearing healthcare professionals and professional healthcare interpreters. (ASLINT-BS YR 3 or 4) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)

INTP-450 - Practicum and Seminar II

This course is a continuation of the field experience for interpreting students. This course provides the student with in-depth experiential education under the supervision of a professional interpreter who functions as the student's mentor. The 15-week practicum consists of a minimum of 135 hours and will focus on gaining experience interpreting. The student may select a practicum placement in the post-secondary, K-12, or community setting. Additionally, students will meet two hours weekly in seminar, with other practicum students, to share observations and experiences gained from the practicum placement. Seminar discussions will focus on advanced language issues in interpretation, application of professional and business ethics, situational concerns and problem solving. The seminar instructor will be the practicum student's supervising instructor. Course requires a minimum of 135 hours of field experiences. Students must complete this course with a minimum grade of C. (This course is restricted to ASLINT-BS Major students.) Lecture 2, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

INTP-451 - Mental Health Interpreting

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of mental health interpreting. Students will become familiar with the DSM-IV and common types of mental illness as well as psychiatric terminology in both English and ASL. Students will examine the role, function, ethics, and challenges of interpreting in mental health settings through the analytical construct of Demand-Control Schema for interpreting work. Students will also learn tools and techniques to utilize while interpreting in psychiatric environments and will have opportunities to interact with mental health professionals. (ASLINT-BS YR 3 or 4) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-460 - Issues in Interpreting

This course offers students an opportunity to integrate content areas in the curriculum through the examination and discussion of issues in the field of interpreting. While the course content and focus will vary depending on current issues and student interest, it will direct attention toward an important issue facing the interpreting profession and will provide an advanced experience of problem solving and value clarification. Students will develop and demonstrate their ability to define a research topic, gather and evaluate scholarly evidence, and present their findings in a paper and presentation. (Prerequisites: Student standing in ASLINT-BS is required. Co-requisite: INTP-435 and INTP-436.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-461 - Introduction to Legal Interpreting

This course will introduce students to the field of legal interpreting. Students will learn about the legal and judicial systems while examining the role, function, ethics, safeguards and challenges of interpreting in legal and courtroom settings. Students will employ a multidisciplinary approach to learning about legal interpreting through legal research and writing, observation, guest lecturers and interpreting practice. (ASLINT-BS YR 3 or 4) Lec/Lab 4, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-471 - Introduction to Cued Speech Transliterating

This course is an introduction to the Cued Speech system of representing spoken English, its history, and application. Students will increase their awareness of spoken English and the pronunciation of words in conversation. They will also understand and describe the purpose of Cued Speech, why parents choose this system for their child who is deaf as well as identify other populations and uses for Cued Speech. Students will understand the language learning benefits of Cued Speech. Upon completion of the course students will be able to accurately cue spoken English. (3rd year status in the program) Class 3, Credit 3 (S) (ASLINT-BS YR 3 or 4) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

INTP-481 - Community Interpreting

This course will address the evolution of professionalization within the field of interpreting, as well as explore various aspects of working in the community and the dynamics surrounding community involvement. This course is highly interactive, highlighting a variety of guest presenter and panelists from the Rochester community. Topics of discussion are: working with Deaf professionals, working with Deaf interpreters, business practices, professional supervision and Video Relay Service (VRS) settings. Within these major topics, discussion will include discretionary practices, ethical decision-making, current standards and community connections and resources. The objective is to guide students in traversing the dialectic, rather than eliciting right or wrong answers that simply reflect the rhetoric of the interpreting field. (3rd or 4th year status in Program). (ASLINT-BS YR 3 or 4) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

INTP-485 - Undergraduate Research: ASL-English Interpretation

This course is a faculty-directed student research project at the undergraduate level. The research will entail an in-depth study in the discipline that could be considered of an original nature. Enrollment in this course requires permission from the Department Chair and completion of the NTID Undergraduate Research Contract. Research, Credits 1 - 4 (Fall, Spring)

INTP-489 - Special Topics: ASL-English Interpretation

The description for the special topics course will be specified in each course proposal. Lecture, Credits 1 - 3 (Fall, Spring)