RIT’s NTID Performing Arts presents August Wilson’s ‘Fences,’ April 11-14

Dark background with African American baseball player, ball field and text August Wilson's Fences.

Fences, the American play written by August Wilson, will be presented next month by the Performing Arts department of Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Shows will run at 7:30 p.m. April 11-13, and 2 p.m. April 14, in Panara Theatre, Lyndon Baines Johnson Hall, on the RIT campus.

RIT/NTID’s Sunshine 2.0 to perform as part of ‘Icons and Inspirations’ at Gallaudet

left to right light skinned female, dark skinned male, light skinned male, dark skinned female all in grey tops and black pants.

Providing insights into the many ways deaf and hearing people can engage and interact is one of the goals of Sunshine 2.0, a traveling theatrical troupe from Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf. RIT/NTID is the world’s first and largest technological college for deaf and hard-of-hearing students.

RIT/NTID to expand education and training through DeafTEC Resource Center

front of LBJ Hall/NTID at dusk.

The National Science Foundation has awarded $1.65 million to DeafTEC: Technological Education Center for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students, which will be used to transition the program into a resource center.

The goal of the DeafTEC Resource Center is to increase the number of deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals in highly skilled technician jobs in which there continues to be underrepresentation and underutilization of such individuals in the workplace.

RIT/NTID team examines Nicaraguan sign language to determine whether languages change so they are easier to produce or to understand

Light skinned male with very little hair, glasses and goatee wearing plaid shirt tie and tan sweater.

New research is helping scientists around the world understand what drives language change, especially when languages are in their infancy. The results will shed light on how the limitations of the human brain change language and provide an understanding of the complex interaction between languages and the human beings who use them.

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