A revolutionary technique developed by an NTID astrophysicist could allow for a better understanding of the fates of solar systems when their stars cease to shine.

Jason Nordhaus, an NTID assistant professor of physics and a program faculty member in RIT’s astrophysical sciences and technology Ph.D. program, has developed a system of complex 3D super-computer algorithms able to pinpoint the existence of previously undiscovered planets and celestial bodies associated with dying stars. His research is partially funded by a three-year grant from the NASA/Space Telescope Science Institute. More.

RIT/NTID student TJ Bartholomew is a third-year exercise science major from New York City. Sports and exercise are very important to Bartholomew, which is why exercise science was such a great fit for him. Outside of classes, he enjoys playing basketball and is involved with the Deaf Basketball Association, an intramural sport at RIT. He also is a member of Men of Color, Honor and Ambition and enjoys reading and exercising on his own during his spare time. More.

RIT/NTID students Carter Henry, a biotechnology and molecular bioscience major from Hill, New Hampshire, and Mark Gjestvang, a biochemistry major from Jamestown, North Dakota, participated in a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program this past summer at Ohio State University. The program is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, and supports underrepresented minority students in STEM and institutions offering limited research opportunities. Henry and Gjestvang were two of 12 students chosen to participate in the program. More.

Meet Sara Kimbley, an RIT/NTID student from Lakeland, Florida. She is a 2017 graduate from RIT's psychology program, and a Bridges scholar.

The Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate Program is the first of its kind that provides scientific mentoring for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals to become strong candidates for doctoral degree programs in biomedical or behavioral science disciplines. The program aims to train and prepare eligible students while they are in one of the approved master’s degree programs at RIT. More.

headshot of white female with long blonde hair and bangs.

The Rochester Bridges to the Doctorate Program is the first of its kind that provides scientific mentoring for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals to become strong candidates for doctoral degree programs in biomedical or behavioral science disciplines. The program aims to train and prepare eligible students while they are in one of the approved master’s degree programs at RIT.

Meet Tori Popov, a 2017 graduate from RIT's biomedical sciences program, and a Bridges scholar. More.