Classes

NHSS-110 - Perspectives on Literature and the Arts

Students are introduced to basic concepts and terminology in the study of the humanities (visual and performing arts, history, and philosophy) through a variety of literary works presented in English and/or American Sign Language (short story, storytelling, novel excerpts, drama, film, poetry, and ASL literature). Students will learn about intellectual/academic inquiry and issues studied within these disciplines. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

NHSS-111 - The Changing American Family

Students are introduced to basic concepts and terminology in the study of the evolving American family from its Judeo-Christian roots to its multi-cultural reality in the 21st century. Students will learn about the nature of the family unit, the contributions of its members to the family organization, the family's contribution to society, and the current trends in the American family. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)

NHSS-120 - Introduction to Performing Arts

Studies the characteristics and elements of theatre and the performing arts, emphasizing the principles and conventions that have guided theatre productions through history. The course examines the ways that theatre influences and is influenced by cultures and by individual life experience. Particular attention is paid to the development of scripts, visual theatre, theatre vocabulary, and the emergence of Deaf and multicultural theatre. Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-122 - Introduction to Stagecraft

Introduces the technical and design processes of theatre, including scenery, costume, lighting, make-up, and prop craft. Students experience the range of skills needed to create successful productions, and identify their own areas of interest and strength for future theatre participation. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)

NHSS-130 - Acting I

An introduction to the actor's craft, process, and technique. Major performance methods are introduced in both physical approaches to acting (Grotowski, Delsarte, Alexander technique, multi-cultural methods from African Griot to Japanese Noh) and psychological approaches (Stanislavsky, Meisner, Hagan, Strasberg). Strategies for script analysis, translation, memorization, stage combat, mask, and mime prepare the student for Acting II. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-132 - Sign Mime, Creative Movement, and Visual Theatre

Expands students understanding of the use of physical space through creative movement strategies. These are supplemented by images, gesture and sign representation of story elements. Techniques developed from visual theatre practices are studied. Through active participation, students learn the language of movement, mime and visual theatre. Ensemble work based on performance standards, character creation and theme development is emphasized. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-134 - Dance I: Jazz and Hip-Hop

Provides students with a wide range of dance movement and dance vocabulary, which is created from jazz dance, hip-hop and other contemporary dance idioms. Students will experience a variety of dance form through physical movement including the styles of Bob Fosse, Michael Bennett and Frank Hatchett as well as elements of street dance, including the styles of Laurie Ann Gibson and Shane Sparks. Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-150 - Deaf Perspectives on Contemporary Civilization

This course introduces students to the study of culture, society, language, communication, the arts and humanities. Topics covered include cultural and linguistic diversity in Hearing and Deaf communities; social groups distinguished on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, class and disability; and artistic works as expressions of cultural values. The course addresses moral, ethical, and personal questions pertaining to fundamental human rights and responsibilities and is intended to prepare students for further study in the arts, humanities and social sciences, including the emerging field of Deaf cultural studies. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-159 - Deaf Community in the Modern World

Introduces students to American and international aspects of Deaf culture and community. Students learn about the language, norms of behavior, values and traditions, of Deaf people. Historical and sociological perspectives and cross-cultural issues related to the hearing and Deaf communities are analyzed. The formation of the Deaf community and Deaf culture is studied to illustrate the meaning of Deaf Heritage and how art, sports, organizations, and technology have combined to impact the lives of Deaf people. The achievements of many Deaf people in a variety of fields are reviewed to underscore self-identity and self-advocacy issues. The study of cultural, economic and political history is used to broaden understanding of current events. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-180 - Introduction to Social Sciences

This course is intended to explore the understanding of human behavior and everyday life using important concepts from social sciences. The course covers the fields of psychology, sociology, and political science. Materials from anthropology and economics may be used as well. The course focuses on the application of the social sciences to the study of business, art, education, government, and other areas of interest. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-199 - Independent Study: Humanities and Social Sciences

The description for each Independent Study course will be specified in each course proposal. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Independent Study, Credits 1 - 4 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-219 - Understanding Human Interaction Through Dramatic Literature

Students will study dramatic literature with a special emphasis on analyzing the interpersonal communication among characters in written texts and engaging in presentations, performances, and role playing. Students will apply their insights to real life situations. They will also present their analyses to an audience and/or perform scenes from plays. The course will enable students to gain important insights into their own patterns of communication and develop effective strategies for presenting information to audiences and engaging in interpersonal communication. Each student is responsible for their own communication in the classroom. This course is open to all RIT students; an interpreter will not be provided. Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

NHSS-223 - Scenic and Lighting Technology

Provides hands-on exploration of basic scenic and lighting techniques utilized in theatre productions. Students gain an understanding of scenic construction methods and technology and lighting practice, as well as the safe and proper use of tools and equipment. This course prepares students for Theatre Practicum and running crew responsibilities. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

NHSS-224 - Scenic Painting and Props

An introduction to the methods and materials of theatrical painting and props through a project-oriented class. Techniques, communication, and use of appropriate materials and tools are emphasized. Students apply the skills learned to individual and group projects. This course prepares students for more specialized work in Theatre Practicum. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-225 - Costume, Mask, and Stage Makeup

Explores basic stage makeup, mask and costume construction techniques. Students will gain an understanding of the visual ways to develop and present a character on stage. Student actors and technicians will create makeup designs, masks, and small costume pieces as a hands-on expression of the research and development of a character concept. This course prepares students for Theatre Practicum and running crew responsibilities. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall)

NHSS-231 - Acting II

A second-level course in the development of college student actors. This course covers advanced acting techniques and vocabulary, both for developing the actor's craft and for understanding the practical theatrical jargon used by professionals. Particular attention is paid to the physical, emotional, and mental actions an actor reveals to his/her audience. Development of script translation technique related to character development is also emphasized. Practical attention is given in preparing the student actor to enter the entertainment industry or community theatre with viable working skills. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to NTID supported students that have completed NHSS-130 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

NHSS-235 - Dance II: Modern Dance and Ballet

This course provides an introduction to Ballet and Modern Dance. Through Ballet's vocabulary (French, Sign, and English), discipline base, protocols, and specific movements, students perform floor, center, and barre work. The course also provides an introduction to dance that gives students access to the language as well as the fundamental movements of Modern Dance. The styles and technique of Martha Graham (contraction) and Jose Limon (fall and rebound) are explored. Ensemble work, performance standards and creation of character and theme are stressed. Each student is responsible for their own communication in the classroom. This course is open to all RIT students; an interpreter will not be provided. Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

NHSS-240 - Theatre History Through Deaf Eyes

Examines theater from its earliest origins to contemporary types of theater and issues in dramatic presentation. The role of theater in society and in a variety of cultures is examined with particular attention to the role of Deaf performers, directors and play creators in specific historical periods. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Spring)

NHSS-248 - Theatre Practicum

Applies technical, performing, script analysis, stage management, and other skills to an actual theatrical production. Students contract with a faculty mentor for responsibilities and the appropriate credit expectations. In addition to production responsibilities, students are expected to complete reading and writing assignments connected to the production. This course is repeatable for credit. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Lecture/Lab, Credits 1 - 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-249 - Seminar in Performing Arts

Using seminar and workshop approaches, this course gives students the opportunity for focused, in-depth study of a selected advanced topic in theatre. Specific topics vary from semester to semester, and address such areas as methods of acting, playwriting, production design, systems of analysis, genres of dance, translation, and historical influences on theatre art. This course is repeatable for credit. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-260 - Deaf People and Civil Rights

Students will learn the history and achievements of Deaf civil rights, as well as current challenges and future directions of Deaf culture and civil rights. Students will learn the basic history of disenfranchised groups in the United States, how the civil rights process is begun and its ultimate impact on the mainstream society. The course places special emphasis on research and analysis of the Americans with Disabilities Act and involvement in a civil rights project. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-269 - Visual Expressions of Deafhood

In this course, students will study how stories about the Deaf experience are communicated visually through various types of artistic expression. The course includes fine arts, performing arts, film, ASL literature and English literature. Attention will be given to historical context, Deaf cultural values, and the themes and symbols used to tell these visual stories. The course will address the role of artistic expression for recording collective cultural memories, for preserving cultural norms/values, and for promoting social justice. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-270 - Multiculturalism in the Deaf Community

Introduces students to multiculturalism in the Deaf community. Students learn about facts and stereotypes related to race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and physical challenges. The cycle and internalization of biases (attitudes) and discrimination (action) will be studied. Recognition of similarities and differences related to disability, medical, racial, ethnic, social-minority, and cultural models will be explored to understand perceptions of disabled vs. able bodied individuals. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-279 - Seminar in Deaf Cultural Studies

Using a seminar approach, this course gives students the opportunity for focused, in-depth study of a specialized topic in the field of Deaf Cultural Studies. Specific topics vary from semester to semester, and address such areas as language and communication, the arts in Deaf culture, identity and diversity in the Deaf community, and political, social and legal issues. This course is repeatable for credit. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-281 - Civic Engagement

This course provides students with opportunities to engage in community service with Deaf and hearing socially responsible and sustainability focused organizations. Some examples of service learning opportunities might include working with Rochester School for the Deaf to establish an edible schoolyard, Habitat for Humanity to help build low cost, energy efficient, sustainable homes or working with organizations such as Foodlink and Rochester Roots which partner with local farmers to provide people in need with healthy food and provide sustainably produced local food. Students will undertake a civic engagement project where their individual contributions will be amplified through purposeful involvement with local and global organizations. Students will research social, political, economic and environmental issues that affect individuals, local and global communities, and become actively involved in seeking, proposing, and acting on solutions to selected problems. Students will explore ways in which change is an individual and collective responsibility, driven by the interconnectivity of self, local community and global society. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3, Credits 3 (Fall, Spring)

NHSS-289 - Special Topics: Humanities and Social Sciences

The description for each Special Topics request will be specified in each course proposal. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture, Credits 1 - 4 (Fall, Spring)